Laserbrain Studios

Games Forum Blog Contact

Post reply

Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days.
Unless you're sure you want to reply, please consider starting a new topic.
Name:
Email:
Subject:
Message icon:

Verification:
Please enter the missing word of the game title "Hidden _______":

shortcuts: hit alt+s to submit/post or alt+p to preview


Topic Summary

Posted by: Windmill_Man
« on: June 14, 2010, 10:17:48 PM »

Actually, I've found a way to not have to switch to NTFS. UBCD4win is much faster from an actual CD then it is from my crappy flash drive. It's actually usable now...
Posted by: Cthulhu
« on: June 14, 2010, 01:21:48 PM »

I would not recommend it, since you get fragmentation, and the system will not know who's the owner of a specific file.

Now I'm not sure what exactly you want to do, and I think it was mentioned before in this thread, but Clonezilla is popular, and does a good job at backing things up, well actually clone you entire HDD, or partition.
Posted by: Windmill_Man
« on: June 14, 2010, 07:07:07 AM »

Ubuntu fully supports NTFS read/write capabilities, right? I'm considering switching to NTFS... I'm getting tired of trying to find a backup program I like and that "volume shadow services" seems good...

Perhaps I'll only switch my system partition to NTFS... after all, it's the only partition that conflicts with backup attempts from within Windows.
Posted by: Flyboy
« on: April 24, 2010, 08:50:55 AM »

Blender is usually quite a RAM hog also, depending on the complexity of the project being worked on.
Posted by: Cthulhu
« on: April 22, 2010, 10:03:24 AM »

Well, if you're not a minimalist as myself, and you want full support for hibernate/suspend you probably could do well with 1024 Mb Swap.

I don't know which programs are heavy on Ram, but Gimp has on occasion used some 200-300 Mb on some big project I was fiddling with.
Posted by: Windmill_Man
« on: April 22, 2010, 09:51:15 AM »

Yeah..... I don't believe I've had more than 1 GB of RAM in use at one time anyway. It's usually at around 500 MB.
Posted by: Cthulhu
« on: April 22, 2010, 09:45:07 AM »

Quote
In XP there's something called a "pagefile"

Yes, that's what I meant.

And yes, if you have multiple Linux OS they can use the same SWAP. My SWAP is currently 2 Gb, (=same as RAM) but that's way more than I need. Next time I repartition my disk, I'll make it 512 Mb. (minimum requirement needed for Suspend/Hibernate).
Posted by: Windmill_Man
« on: April 22, 2010, 09:42:03 AM »

I was beat to it! :pinch:
Posted by: Windmill_Man
« on: April 22, 2010, 09:41:08 AM »

I don't think it's any different with Vista, but... In XP there's something called a "pagefile" (Which is an actual file somewhere on your Windows partition.). Basically, it's virtual memory. You can change the size of the pagefile, but by default it adds 150% to your current memory. My computer has 1024 MB of RAM, therefore, the pagefile adds 1536 MB of virtual memory to that.

I learned that Linux uses something called a "swap partition" to achieve the same thing. As the name suggests, it actually reserves a small partition for virtual memory. I read somewhere if you have two (or more I imagine) different Linux Distros on your system, you can make them use the same swap partition.

I don't think the pagefile and the swap partition will conflict with each other.

I think I'm right... :heh:
Posted by: Cthulhu
« on: April 22, 2010, 09:37:14 AM »

Quote from: "VincentFirePony"
That's one thing I noticed and like abt Ubuntu/Linux is that it doesn't lock up as frequently as my Vista does.
Tho maybe it locks up more often due to lack of virtual memory since I'm dual-booting...

By "lock in" I meant that MS forces you to use their products and nothing else.

But I'm with Flyboy on this thing, having a Dual boot setup only affects you in the way that you have another OS hogging disk space. Windows uses real "RAM" and virtual memory in a special switching/virtual memory file that it uses to write excess RAM to the HDD. Linux does the same, but doesn't use a file on your C:\ but rather has its own SWAP-partition, with a special SWAP-filesystem that makes it faster. Both methods gives you "virtual RAM" on your Hard drive, and both systems ONLY works when the OS i booted. Meaning Windows will not affect you in any way when you run Linux. (other than hogging the disk space...)

(Now if you did a Wubi-install (=install Ubuntu inside windows) the above might not hold.)
Posted by: VincentFirePony
« on: April 22, 2010, 07:07:22 AM »

yes but windows uses virtual memory, so i'm told. so it uses extra memory to soup up the speed so on and so forth.
I could be wrong.
So far they have coexisted peacefully. I still want to get rid of those extra choices on the grub boot choice screen thingy.
Posted by: Flyboy
« on: April 22, 2010, 06:57:36 AM »

But the dual-boot just means that two or more OSs peacefully coexist (hopefully!) on the same hard drive, but only one is booted at any given time, so the two aren't fighting over RAM/other system resources.
Posted by: VincentFirePony
« on: April 22, 2010, 02:19:21 AM »

That's one thing I noticed and like abt Ubuntu/Linux is that it doesn't lock up as frequently as my Vista does.
Tho maybe it locks up more often due to lack of virtual memory since I'm dual-booting...
Posted by: Cthulhu
« on: April 21, 2010, 06:19:44 PM »

Not being "locked in" is a major advantage, in my opinion. And that it's light on resources.

Also the free software for Linux has a standard that's WAY higher than all the Shareware etc that a regular Windows user might come in contact with. So it's a pity if they think Linux is of the same poor quality as their tested shareware/free-ware on XP.

Yeah, I know, I'm like trying to force feed everyone my opinions. I hate that.  :heh:
to each his own.
Posted by: Flyboy
« on: April 21, 2010, 06:12:11 PM »

@Cthulhu: You should totally become a salesman. :eeeee:

@VincentFirePony: I can't think of anything not already on Cthulhu's list at the moment... but if I do I'll post it.